A STORIED PAST of Detroit's MOST
ICONIC MUSIC EMPIRE

 

BORN IN THE LATE 50'S, THE FAMOUS DETROIT MOTOWN RECORD COMPANY BROUGHT ABOUT AN INFECTIOUS ENERGY TO THE MOTOR CITY

“MUSICAL FUN FOR EVERYONE” PRINT ADVERTISEMENT, 1940

THE YEAR IS 1926. DETROIT BUSINESS IS BOOMING.
A German immigrant named Rudolph Wurlitzer has already built an organ empire in the United States. The Fox, the Fisher, the Michigan and the Fillmore all need Wurlitzer’s “Mighty Machine.” As a tribute to Rudolph Wurtlizer’s success and to Detroit as a rising star in the forefront of American cities, the Wurtlizer building is constructed. 

She is slender, elegant and remarked by the Detroit Times as a ‘sheer beauty’. Filled with music for five decades as a music store, recording studio, repair shop and concert space, the Wurlitzer lived up to it’s name as “the world’s largest music house.” That is…until the music stopped.

50 YEARS LATER, the Wurlitzer moves out. Small firms shuffle in, then out. Lights go out. The streets of the once celebrated city empty. All is quiet and seemingly forgotten. But there is a small flame burning, nurtured by the believers and lovers who still can’t quite forget Detroit’s collective past.

Today, the Wurlitzer is reborn as The Siren Hotel, a tribute to what came before and a nod to the unwritten future of America’s most beguiling city. The test of time is long but we’re in no rush. 

THE SIREN PENTHOUSE PRIOR TO RECONSTRUCTION 

THE FAÇADE RESTORED TO ITS ORIGINAL RENAISSANCE REVIVAL CONSTRUCTION 

THE CLEAREST DETAILS OF THE PAST
ARE LEFT TO THE MEMORIES OF THOSE WHO
BUILD THE FUTURE. THEY MAY REMEMBER
A COLOR OR SOUND. A MAN OR WOMAN.
THE LYRICS TO A SONG OR THE MUSIC ITSELF.
BUT SOME JUST REMEMBER THE BUILDING.